Artisans Festival 2014 – Meet the Maker, Seth Simpson

November 27, 2014

3-300Meet Seth Simpson.  Simpson is one of over 35 artists showing at the annual Artisans Festival, Friday & Saturday, November 28 & 29 at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Tickets $3, $5 Weekend Pass, Children 15 and under free.  Daily hours are 10am-5pm.

Simpson’s hand thrown porcelain and stoneware forms are the result of calculated decisions of process; the unpredictability of fire, and the influence of place upon my work. his aesthetic stretches across the pacific to Japan and Hawaii and from his home in the Pacific Northwest to the deserts of the southwest. His work has elements of Asian calligraphy and manmade mark making, but more than anything Simpson tries to rely on the beauty of nature to inspire him.

What was the art background of your childhood?

I was not raised by artists, but art was always something big in my family. My grandma and great grandma were artists and my and parents created art for fun; My ancestors were sculpture artists in old Havana, Cuba. So, my childhood included a tradition of art and a sense of joy from creative outlets.

When did you recognize a special talent or interest in art? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember a specific setting?

I was raised rurally so there were not so many other kids around. I spent a lot of time alone in nature and was inspired to create there. As for a moment, in grade school I found he was good at stuff like illustration. I remember the positive feedback felt good.

It has been a process. I started with 2D and 3D him early on, but worked for potter in high school which helped change my focus.

What did your parents say when you told them you were going to be an artist? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember the specific setting?

My parents were very encouraging and supportive.   They figured, “if it can be done, I can do it.”

Who or what were your early creative inspirations?

My family, history of successful, talented artists. Where I live in Northern California. Nature. The outdoors. Sense of place. How colors change during seasons. Light on flora and fauna. The effect that light and form has emotionally.

Which artists are you following currently?

Abstract expressionism how color is used to express emotion and pass it on to the viewer. Asian and Japanese art. Contemporary shapes that blend ancient and modern influences. Function is a huge aspect. I like art that is a good tool for everyday life.  Peter Volkus.

What, besides the obvious, do you like about selling your art?

I love the interaction with the people who purchase my art. I work in the studio alone a lot and it’s nice to meet the public. Gives a sense of place and motivations me to keep doing what I’m doing.

What do you think is the role of art in a society?

Art has lots of different roles. My art is to enrich people’s daily life with something small like a favorite mug. Art brings a sense of place, familiarity, joy, beauty to the everydayness of life.

What have been the biggest sacrifices you’ve made for your art?

The predicatble living that comes from a steady 9-5 lifestyle. I live with the unknown and unpredictable. Time wise, I work long hours and sacrifice time with family and friends. I am doing what I love, but it takes some other things I love away from myself and others.

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Artisans Festival 2014 – Meet the Maker, Liz Collins

November 27, 2014

2-300Meet Liz Collins.  Collins is one of over 35 artists showing at the annual Artisans Festival, Friday & Saturday, November 28 & 29 at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Tickets $3, $5 Weekend Pass, Children 15 and under free.  Daily hours are 10am-5pm.

Despite compelling argument that she should become an architect, Collins graduated from The University of Colorado with a Bachelors of Fine Art and a lot of “tsssk tsssk’s” from the sidelines. Noting her artwork’s odd perspective with walls and windows out of plumb the consensus was that it was just as well she didn’t follow their advice. It is exactly this off-kilter look that has become the signature style of her work.

Collins began by doing serigraphs (silkscreen prints), quickly moving into oil pastels, and then onto mixed media, always retaining a certain whimsy to her work. Evident in every medium is her familiar infusion of life and movement in all things. Breaking up the usual planes of color with maps, sheet music and poetry keeps her work dynamic, never stale or static.

More recently her fascination with maps and travel has added another dimension to her work. “Travelling the world I have realized how I love to watch people in their every-day activities, whether it be selling chai on the bustling street corner, or riding a bicycle through inconceivable traffic. I love to watch their limbs, their movement, the subtle ways they hold themselves, their feet, their hands. Using maps, or poetry or music, to me, adds an element of surprise as well as a sense of place.”

What was the art background of your childhood home?

My parents didn’t talk a lot about art though they did take us to museums in NYC. They had one artist whose original art was in our home. My mom would also buy original art in galleries when we’d go to the Jersey shore.

I remember the romance of finding a set of hard pastels in a wooden box in my Gmas attic.

When did you recognize a special talent or interest in art? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember a specific setting?

I remember it as a moment in the 4th grade. I had always liked to draw, but Laney Crawford in 4th grade was really good and could draw anything and she showed me how to “draw what you see.” It was like a Zen moment of realization. Suddenly, I realized I could draw anything. I’ve always loved art; the smell, the look, being alone, the doing of it.

What did your parents say when you told them you were going to be an artist? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember the specific setting?

My parents wanted me to be an architect because that was the practical thing. They appreciated my talent, but didn’t think I could make a living at it. Then, in my last year of high school, my lifelong friend, Emmy, said “of course you’re going to major in art.” And, that was that. They got used to the idea.

Who or what were your early creative inspirations?

Laney Crawford in 4th grade. My friend and co-worker, Ann, in Boulder, CO when I was a young sign painter. She started actually selling silk screen art. I thought, if she can do it, I can do it so I did.

Artistically, Thomas McKnight who was a silk screener. I saw his stuff in NYC gallery and loved it. He painted interiors looking out into the moon and night sky. They were happy and bright. Also, Thomas Hart Benton of the 1930s. He painted rolling landscapes and motion.

Which artists are you following currently?

Nobody, really. Maybe modern artists. Contemporary paintings. I am inspired by the new look of contemporary, modern art.

What, besides the obvious, do you like about selling your art?

I love talking to people about my art. I like hearing what people see in my work. It’s interesting what it brings out in people.

What do you think is the role of art in a society?

Art has the capability to make people happy. It brings out good feelings. It brings out deep feelings in people. It has the ability to revives them and add passion to their lives.

What is the funkiest job you’ve taken to support your art?

I am lucky enough to have always made my living as an artist.

Anything particularly interesting or striking about your story that you’d like to share?

My current work celebrates my life and my life as a traveler. The maps, the nostalgia they hold for the days of map travel, bring depth and a shared appreciation of how the world is changing. Maps evoke both adventure and safety because they indicate you are on an unknown road and actually tell you where to go.

I honor and appreciate map makers and the beauty they put to their task.

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Artisans Festival 2014 – Meet the Maker, Shawn Ray Harris

November 24, 2014

2-300Meet San Francisco based photographer Shawn Ray Harris.  Harris’ development as an artist has been of two paths: the first path, exploring the medium itself by making three-dimensional photography while working in manufacturing; and, the second path, using photography traditionally, exploring his personal interests, often with a sense of humor. He recalls an art teacher saying, “Have a job and make art on the side. Eventually, depending on your commitment, one will win out and you will find yourself doing what you were meant to do.” This holds true. Six years ago, Harris began making art full time. His art also had two separate paths that became one: he focuses on making work that is deeply personal and that also pushes the boundaries of photography.

Harris thinks of the camera/photography as a tool, as an in-depth sketch book that captures ideas. He uses a camera, sometimes in a traditional sense, most of the time in tandem with a computer and editing software. Cameras, film, software and technologies will change. He enjoys working through how to best use available tools to capture, record, and translate his imagination. That’s what’s important to him. “Along the way, if I enable myself and a few others to laugh…then I feel I am doing what I was meant to do,”

Harris is one of over 35 artists showing at the annual Artisans Festival, Friday & Saturday, November 28 & 29 at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Tickets $3, $5 Weekend Pass, Children 15 and under free.  Daily hours are 10am-5pm.

What was the art background of your childhood?

My dad did landscape oil painting on the side, but put it away early on. My mom always doing crafts for sale. Their interests gave me the ability to do my own thing because there were always supplies to tinker with. They definitely put value put on creating things.

When did you recognize a special talent or interest in art? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember a specific setting?

My interest and talent were always there as long as I remember. I wasn’t interested in other subjects like math. Art always held my interest. It gave me direction. My teachers in mid school and high school saw my talent and interest. They were good at inspiring me to keep doing art as a valuable and pursuable field.

What did your parents say when you told them you were going to be an artist? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember the specific setting?

I wasn’t a moment. I went to art school because it became the obvious choice. My parents always supported doing that which you love to do. They, probably like other parents, were a bit concerned about me making a living at it, but realized it’s important to do what you love in life.

Who or what were your early creative inspirations?

I saw other students at school who were really good and that was motivating. I wanted that, too. I specifically remember noticing good imagery, Annie Leibowitz especially. She blew my mind with her intelligence, creativity and playfulness. Jerry Ueslmann, who was a traditional dark room photographer. He did some super surreal work and I was amazed he could do that with photography.

Which artists are you following currently?

No one especially. Just my muse. Street artists if anything catches my interest. I have a total respect for spray can art. I am inspired by their ability, the design, the place, the temporary nature with danger in the background. The way they do it makes art available to everyone, not just art people. They put it right in our backyard.

What, besides the obvious, do you like about selling your art?

I like the gauge on how it’s being received. The instant feedback. Being acceptable and being affirmed encourages me to move in further and keep going. The fact that I can make art that is interesting to me and can be sold is pretty fantastic.

What do you think is the role of art in a society?

I hope the role of the artist is to point out and/or comment on society at large. I think I’m still working on my art as a comment on something larger than dressing up in masks and taking pictures of myself. Art is so much more enjoyable, approachable, deeper, broader and bigger than just something for sale.

What have been the biggest sacrifices you’ve made for your art?

I’d say sometimes I am too focused and keep on track at the expense of people around him.

What is the funkiest job you’ve taken to support your art?

One eclectic urban patron of mine had me gold leaf a gorilla skeleton. That was weird. I Pop Arted it.

Anything particularly interesting or striking about your story that you’d like to share?

I am also an oil painter and mixed media artist. I see myself as just an average Joe plugging away.1-3004-300

Artisans Festival 2014 – Meet the Maker, Kelly Bechtold

November 21, 2014

3-350Meet Kelly Bechtold owner and designer of Girl on a Motorcycle.  The lovechild of glamour and grit, Girl on a Motorcycle is a California conceived, Colorado born luxe leather accessories label. Founded in 2007 by Bechtold, the brand has become known for unique handmade “must have” allure. The inspired design & painstaking construction of pieces utilizes the highest quality leather hides, and distinctive riveted hardware. Girl on a Motorcycle style is a blend of 1960’s innocence and 1970’s Rock n’ Roll decadence. Incorporating timeless style with strength and durability, this line has a lasting quality almost unrecognizable in today’s disposable culture.  Bechtold believes in things that last. My bags and accessories are timelessly designed, made by hand and build to endure. No machines, no factories-just Bechtold, a workbench, some hand tools and a good record playing on the turntable. Her materials are sourced of the finest produces American deer, buffalo and cattle hides and feature high quality fixtures and adornments.

Bechtold is one of over 35 artists showing at the annual Artisans Festival, Friday & Saturday, November 28 & 29 at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Tickets $3, $5 Weekend Pass, Children 15 and under free.  Daily hours are 10am-5pm.

What was the art background of your childhood?

I was raised off the grid in a Colorado mountain canyon by a hippie mom who encouraged me to see the design in everything. She valued taking time for dreaming and hearing the call of my creative soul. She left me with an appreciation of nature’s design and repetitive patterns.

When did you recognize a special talent or interest in art? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember a specific setting?

In my early 20s I worked in a vintage clothing store and was obsessed with making our displays beautiful. After that, I worked as a wardrobe stylist and found I had a knack for set design. I am obsessed with the special arrangement of beauty.

I was surrounded by people who were “fine artists” and didn’t see myself in their league so I kept it quiet. Also, I just never found the fashion industry inspiring or interesting. It had too many rules.

Then, 7 years ago I started making leather bags and found a love for taking a big hide and having the muse bring out the beauty in it. I was only mediocre at first, but persevered until one day I made something “cool!” I felt connected to the divine inspiration and started creating a collection. My family and friends liked them and gave me a lot of encouragement. Now, I consider myself a designer and I love my bags. Each has a personality and is looking for just the right owner.

What did your parents say when you told them you were going to be an artist? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember the specific setting?

My mom always kind of knew I was going to do something artistic and so she wasn’t surprised. She raised me to be independent and a little bit different. Now, she is over the moon proud and couldn’t be happier that my work arises in me from a deep place and is nature based.

Who or what were your early creative inspirations?

My supportive family and teachers I’ve had along the way. And, NATURE absolutely.

Which artists are you following currently?

My musician friends bring life and joy. Rhiannon the bead maker. Her design and color choices bring out the goddess in women who wear her jewelry.

I share fascination with woodworkers who see form in raw materials.

Louise Nedelson. Georgia O’Keefe. Rustic artisans. Those who see what can come from the inside and shine through from its life force. Paco Rabin. “I traded my needle and thread for pliers and a blow torch.”

What, besides the obvious, do you like about selling your art?

I like that I’ve gone from making purses to really creating art forms. I like the direct human interaction and the joy that I see when someone gets something fine for themselves. I like making bags that are “different, unique and get better with time” just like women. I like that my artform gives comfort and beauty that can leave the house with you.

What do you think is the role of art in a society?

To inspire the dreamer in each person and show that there are languages each of us speak and all of them matter. Art allows us to hear the voice of love and that the universe give to us all. Artisans put that love into form and give it away to everyone. Art connects us to other dimensions of the human experience.

What have been the biggest sacrifices you’ve made for your art?

Stability and peace of mind about the future. Being willing to live the roller coaster of success. Wear and tear on my body.

Anything particularly interesting or striking about your story that you’d like to share?

I am self-taught. Everything that comes out of me comes from somewhere unique to me. I’ve never taken classes; no one has taken time to teach me. My art comes out of my experiences and my inner vision.

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Artisans Festival 2014 – Meet the Maker, David Wong

November 20, 2014

2-300Meet photographer David Wong.  Wong began showing his work only eight short years ago after a prior lifetime career in film production. He was inspired by his teacher, Ted Orland, one of Ansel Adams assistants, who felt he had a unique eye for light, subject and composition. In his work, Wong looks for a unique sense of art and story as created by the subject, light, composition, movement, and other “of the moment” factors. Wong’s soft spoken manner is evident in his photos, each of which offers a calm, peaceful reflection of nature’s beauty.

Wong is one of over 35 artists showing at the annual Artisans Festival, Friday & Saturday, November 28 & 29 at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Tickets $3, $5 Weekend Pass, Children 15 and under free.  Daily hours are 10am-5pm.

What was the art background of your childhood?

I was a photographer from the age of 15. I did darkroom work and experimented a bit but it wasn’t until later in my life that I “woke-up” to art and photography. I made a switch from engineering and business mentality to an art orientation.

When did you recognize a special talent or interest in art? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember a specific setting?

I had taken a photography class from Ted Orland, who was one of Ansel Adams assistants. I did a photograph of a lighthouse at night for the class and I found out later that he was showing the photograph to his classes. It gave me inspiration and encouragement that maybe I could do this. Shortly after, I entered a number of photographs in a show and was successful in selling many of them. I never looked back.

What did your parents say when you told them you were going to be an artist? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember the specific setting?

My parents were gone by the time I became an artist.

Who or what were your early creative inspirations?

Edward Hopper, Edward Weston, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Ansel Adams, Georgia O’Keeffe, Claude Monet, Vincent Van Gogh

Which artists are you following currently?

Charles Cramer, Annie Leibovitz, Art Wolfe

What, besides the obvious, do you like about selling your art?

I enjoy relating my love of art to the people who enjoy my vision. I very much like teaching photography and getting others to excel in their development of photography and the arts.

What do you think is the role of art in a society?

Art brings great enjoyment and appreciation to life. It expands ways of thinking and creativity in how we tackle our individual lives. I believe that people who learn to appreciate art in their lives tend to be less self-focused.

What have been the biggest sacrifices you’ve made for your art?

I don’t feel that I’ve had to make big sacrifices for my art, in fact, it’s quite the opposite. I have gained much by being an artist.

What is the funkiest job you’ve taken to support your art?

I pretty much enjoy all my work.

Anything particularly interesting or striking about your story that you’d like to share?

I didn’t come to art until I was almost 60. I think self-doubt and thinking that you can’t do art is too big an obstacle for many. I never thought I had an artistic bone in my body. I used to hate going to museums and galleries! Now, I am biggest student. Never too late to learn.

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Artisans Festival 2014 – Meet the Maker, LeeAnn Brook

November 19, 2014

PaintingSundownMeet LeeAnn Brook a Nevada City, California-based artist whose works explore landscape through color and movement. Using an expressive layering of colors, textures, and awareness of light, Brook’s paintings are inspired by environments of water, grasslands, gardens and forests that surround us.

Brook is one of over 35 artists showing at the annual Artisans Festival, Friday & Saturday, November 28 & 29 at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Tickets $3, $5 Weekend Pass, Children 15 and under free.  Daily hours are 10am-5pm.

Filled with intensity of color, light and unique textures, Brook’s large format contemporary landscape paintings are built with layers of color and patterns that reflect the layers of nature. Depth is created with the use of subtle patterns and textures that are then integrated into the painting as a whole, where the technique becomes secondary only to the full effect of a vibrant landscape, encouraging us to notice what is beneath the surface of what we see every day.

What was the art background of your childhood?

My dad was an artist, but he died when I was six. My mom was not artistic so she put art mentors in my life, starting with a neighbor boy who taught me about classic art and artists.

When did you recognize a special talent or interest in art? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember a specific setting?

In kindergarten I knew I would be an artist. Literally, it was the very first time the teacher said “tomorrow we’ll be working with paint.” I brought my brush, my smock, and cousin’s majorette baton to paint. I loved that thing and when I painted it the other kids kept coming around saying it was good and asking if I was going to be an artist someday. I said, “yes” and that day encouragement set the course of my life.

What did your parents say when you told them you were going to be an artist? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember the specific setting?

My mom knew I loved art and continued to support my talent. She also made sure I developed my secretarial skills. I suppose she thought art would be my hobby.

Then, when I was a senior in high school, I took a graphic arts class and loved it. My family wasn’t able to pay for me to go to college, but my teachers and guidance counselor encouraged me to apply to a graphic arts school. The day I told my mom, she said something like, “Oh no, honey, you need to be a secretary.” And, then I went to graphic design school.

Who or what were your early creative inspirations?

I’ve had a lot of mentors who helped me recognize my inspirations.

There was an older kid in my neighborhood who was very artistic. My mom got him to come and teach me to paint. I lived in a very rural area where there wasn’t much exposure to art. He gave me the classics.

Then a neighbor moved in who also recognized my talent and mentored me.  I attended a great high school that had an incredible art program.  And, then, at 18, met a man who was an abstract painter and he introduced me to the art scene; and the ins and outs of being an artist like museums, supplies, other artists.

What, besides the obvious, do you like about selling your art?

I love talking about art. The first time I did open studios, finally after 40 years, I was able to overcome my shyness and just couldn’t shut up. I feel that’s what doing art shows is about; the conversation between artist and collector is one about what turns you on. I thrive on the direct interaction and connection.

What do you think is the role of art in a society?

My role as an artist is to do art that gives enjoyment to someone else. My art is made to bring beauty to a patron’s home. I get to share and pass on beauty. Art brings beauty and appreciation.

What have been the biggest sacrifices you’ve made for your art?

I don’t feel I have sacrificed. My life has been nothing but full and rich. Being an artist has brought so much to me. I am humbled by the life I get to live.

What is the funkiest job you’ve taken to support your art?

Luckily, every job I’ve worked in has been related to being an artist and a businessperson. The funkiness is just that it’s my business and I do everything from toilets to windows.

Anything particularly interesting or striking about your story that you’d like to share?

Most of my career has been as a graphic designer. I started painting again about 12 years ago and now I have 2 studios.

I just published a book that will be out by the time of Artisans. It is about my work and how in art one medium affects another. It’ll make a great gift item.

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ARTISANS FESTIVAL 2014 – MEET THE MAKER, BRIGITTE MAYER

November 17, 2014

1-300Meet Davis, CA based artist Brigitte Mayer.  Mayer’s work, whether printing, painting, sculpture, carving, or furniture and lamps – is steeped in the German forms and fairytales of her childhood. The spare tidiness and love of line are the influence of her cabinetmaker father. Finding art in found objects, such as beautifully transformed cocoa pods of hundreds of formica samples, creates the unusual diversity.

Mayer is one of over 35 artists showing at the annual Artisans Festival, Friday & Saturday, November 28 & 29 at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Tickets $3, $5 Weekend Pass, Children 15 and under free.  Daily hours are 10am-5pm.

What was the art background of your childhood?

My dad was a master craftsman and cabinet builder straight from Germany. I thought it was boring and would never have thought building things out of wood would be my ultimate passion in those days.

When did you recognize a special talent or interest in art? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember a specific setting?

Others in my family had talent, but I never saw it in myself. I was a mom. When my kids got more independent I needed something to do so I started working with a friend who worked with wood. To my surprise, I realized it was fun, interesting, and I was good at it. Then, it turned out people liked it, wanted to buy my art and the whole business started snowballing.

These days, I’m a tool junkie. I love the challenge of finding the right tool for the job and learning to use it with expertise. It’s like a puzzle and I love puzzles.

What did your parents say when you told them you were going to be an artist? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember the specific setting?

My parents were already gone by the time I started creating things. I took them around to some local shops and they liked my work. and she just kept giving them her works and they kept selling. Decided she wanted a studio and refurbished the garage as a workspace. It was fun, people liked her stuff, and they were inspired by her creations which keeps fueling her craft.

Who or what were your early creative inspirations?

Definitely I was inspired by my dad. He could make anything. I also had a creative aunt who I was named after. She was an abstract painter, ceramicist, and overall fine artist whereas my dad’s works were functional. I guess I’m a bit of both.

Which artists are you following currently?

I mostly see something and the materials catch my eye, not really people or artists. I am always looking for interesting ways to use materials and tools.

What, besides the obvious, do you like about selling your art?

I feel validated. When someone actually pays their good hard earned money for what I create, I feel successful.

What do you think is the role of art in a society?

Art makes us feel alive and separates us from being just pure animals. The ability to appreciate creating makes life bearable and interesting. Creativity has the power to evoke excitement regardless of how the circumstances of the day are going.

What have been the biggest sacrifices you’ve made for your art?

Well, my kids say “It’s all you do!” Maybe, the ability to be nurturing, helpful, and available to the kids on some level.

What is the funkiest job you’ve taken to support your art?

Doing art and making money at it feels like the funkiest job I’ve ever done.

Anything particularly interesting or striking about your story that you’d like to share?

I have a hard time letting go of my art because I love each piece so much.

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Zion I with Los Rakas and Locksmith ~ Wednesday, February 18, 2015

November 10, 2014


Zion I ~ “Masters of Ceremony”

zioni_losrakas_IGThe Miners Foundry will present Zion I on Wednesday, February 18, 2015.  With a style that borrows from hip hop, trance, drum’n’bass, and reggae, Zion I is equally mystical and mystifying.  Los Rakas and Locksmith will open the show.

Doors open at 7:30 p.m. and the music begins at 8:30 p.m.  Tickets are $20.00 in Advance and $25.00 at the Door.

Tickets may be purchased online, in person or by phone at the Miners Foundry, or in person at Briar Patch Co-Op.

Tickets

 

Zion I double.jpgHaving opened for rap royalty including De La Soul, Rakim, and Run D.M.C., Zion I is a duo of genre-bender pride that has made a name for itself on the Bay Area scene.

Oakland’s MC Zumbi and DJ / Producer Amp Live blend hip-hop and trip-hop beats with lyrics focused on a message of unity, hope, and spiritual awareness while successfully mixing spiritualism and hip-hop.

 

 

Photo by Akim Aginksy

Photo by Akim Aginksy

The Mission of the Miners Foundry Cultural Center is to preserve, enhance and utilize the historic Miners Foundry for cultural, educational and social activities.

The Foundry is a non profit organization, pleased to support the Nevada County theatre community.

To support cultural programming and the preservation of the historic Miners Foundry, please become a member or make a donation today.

The Second City Hits Home ~ Friday, February 6, 2015

November 6, 2014

Second City Hits Home City LimitsThe Miners Foundry is pleased to present The Second City Hits Home on Friday, February 6, 2015.  Nevada City gets in on the laughter as The Second City takes on all the news that’s fit to twist.  The biggest headlines!  The hot-button issues!  And it’s all served up with with a side of that famous Chicago-style improv.  Don’t miss your chance to see the superstars of tomorrow live on stage now, when The Second City Hits Home!

Doors open at 7:30 p.m. and the show starts at 8:30 p.m.  Tickets are $40 in Advance and $45 at the Door.  Tickets are currently available to Miners Foundry members.  For more information about becoming a member of the Miners Foundry, please click here.  Tickets may be purchased online, in person or by phone at the Miners Foundry, or in person at Briar Patch.  Tickets will be available to the general public soon.

Tickets

SCHH_mini_poster_grafxThe Second City opened its doors on a snowy Chicago night in December of 1959.  No one could have guessed this small cabaret theatre would become the most influential and prolific comedy theatre in the world.  With roots in the improvisational games of Viola Spolin, The Second City developed an entirely unique way of creating and performing comedy.  From Mike Myers to Steve Carell, Stephen Colbert to Tina Fey, The Second City imprint is felt across every entertainment medium.

 

 

 

Photo by Akim Aginksy

Photo by Akim Aginksy

The Mission of the Miners Foundry Cultural Center is to preserve, enhance and utilize the historic Miners Foundry for cultural, educational and social activities.

The Foundry is a non profit organization, pleased to support the Nevada County theatre community.

To support cultural programming and the preservation of the historic Miners Foundry, please become a member or make a donation today.

Robert Burns Dinner and Concert ~ Saturday, January 24, 2015

November 6, 2014
Robert Burns

Robert Burns

Gold Country Celtic Society will host its 24th annual Robert Burns Dinner and Concert on Saturday, January 24, 2015 at the Miners Foundry.

An elegant dinner served by Chef Antonio Ayasteran will feature a choice of beef, fish, or vegetarian entrees.

Playing of the Pipes and Offerings of Haggis and wee drams of Single-malt Scotch will accompany the traditional toasts: Address to the Haggis, Toast to the Lassies and Lads, and the Immortal Memory Address to Burns.

 

 

 

Men of WorthFollowing dinner, a traditional Scottish Ceilidh will feature the music of acclaimed Celtic band Men of Worth.

The Brigadoon Pub will be offering single-malt Scotch, local wines, and other libations throughout the evening.

This is a special event, so semi-formal or formal Scottish attire or other formal apparel is appropriate.

Doors open at 4:00 p.m. with dinner seating at 5:30 p.m.  Tickets are $55 for Gold Country Celtic Society Members and $60 for Non Members.  Tickets are available at the Nevada City Chamber of Commerce or by calling (530) 274-0185.

 

 

 

Photo by Akim Aginksy

Photo by Akim Aginksy

The Mission of the Miners Foundry Cultural Center is to preserve, enhance and utilize the historic Miners Foundry for cultural, educational and social activities.

The Foundry is a non profit organization.

To support cultural programming and the preservation of the historic Miners Foundry, please become a member or make a donation today.