Posts

Artisans Festival 2014 – Meet the Maker, Seth Simpson

3-300Meet Seth Simpson.  Simpson is one of over 35 artists showing at the annual Artisans Festival, Friday & Saturday, November 28 & 29 at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Tickets $3, $5 Weekend Pass, Children 15 and under free.  Daily hours are 10am-5pm.

Simpson’s hand thrown porcelain and stoneware forms are the result of calculated decisions of process; the unpredictability of fire, and the influence of place upon my work. his aesthetic stretches across the pacific to Japan and Hawaii and from his home in the Pacific Northwest to the deserts of the southwest. His work has elements of Asian calligraphy and manmade mark making, but more than anything Simpson tries to rely on the beauty of nature to inspire him.

What was the art background of your childhood?

I was not raised by artists, but art was always something big in my family. My grandma and great grandma were artists and my and parents created art for fun; My ancestors were sculpture artists in old Havana, Cuba. So, my childhood included a tradition of art and a sense of joy from creative outlets.

When did you recognize a special talent or interest in art? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember a specific setting?

I was raised rurally so there were not so many other kids around. I spent a lot of time alone in nature and was inspired to create there. As for a moment, in grade school I found he was good at stuff like illustration. I remember the positive feedback felt good.

It has been a process. I started with 2D and 3D him early on, but worked for potter in high school which helped change my focus.

What did your parents say when you told them you were going to be an artist? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember the specific setting?

My parents were very encouraging and supportive.   They figured, “if it can be done, I can do it.”

Who or what were your early creative inspirations?

My family, history of successful, talented artists. Where I live in Northern California. Nature. The outdoors. Sense of place. How colors change during seasons. Light on flora and fauna. The effect that light and form has emotionally.

Which artists are you following currently?

Abstract expressionism how color is used to express emotion and pass it on to the viewer. Asian and Japanese art. Contemporary shapes that blend ancient and modern influences. Function is a huge aspect. I like art that is a good tool for everyday life.  Peter Volkus.

What, besides the obvious, do you like about selling your art?

I love the interaction with the people who purchase my art. I work in the studio alone a lot and it’s nice to meet the public. Gives a sense of place and motivations me to keep doing what I’m doing.

What do you think is the role of art in a society?

Art has lots of different roles. My art is to enrich people’s daily life with something small like a favorite mug. Art brings a sense of place, familiarity, joy, beauty to the everydayness of life.

What have been the biggest sacrifices you’ve made for your art?

The predicatble living that comes from a steady 9-5 lifestyle. I live with the unknown and unpredictable. Time wise, I work long hours and sacrifice time with family and friends. I am doing what I love, but it takes some other things I love away from myself and others.

2-3001-300

Artisans Festival 2014 – Meet the Maker, Liz Collins

2-300Meet Liz Collins.  Collins is one of over 35 artists showing at the annual Artisans Festival, Friday & Saturday, November 28 & 29 at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Tickets $3, $5 Weekend Pass, Children 15 and under free.  Daily hours are 10am-5pm.

Despite compelling argument that she should become an architect, Collins graduated from The University of Colorado with a Bachelors of Fine Art and a lot of “tsssk tsssk’s” from the sidelines. Noting her artwork’s odd perspective with walls and windows out of plumb the consensus was that it was just as well she didn’t follow their advice. It is exactly this off-kilter look that has become the signature style of her work.

Collins began by doing serigraphs (silkscreen prints), quickly moving into oil pastels, and then onto mixed media, always retaining a certain whimsy to her work. Evident in every medium is her familiar infusion of life and movement in all things. Breaking up the usual planes of color with maps, sheet music and poetry keeps her work dynamic, never stale or static.

More recently her fascination with maps and travel has added another dimension to her work. “Travelling the world I have realized how I love to watch people in their every-day activities, whether it be selling chai on the bustling street corner, or riding a bicycle through inconceivable traffic. I love to watch their limbs, their movement, the subtle ways they hold themselves, their feet, their hands. Using maps, or poetry or music, to me, adds an element of surprise as well as a sense of place.”

What was the art background of your childhood home?

My parents didn’t talk a lot about art though they did take us to museums in NYC. They had one artist whose original art was in our home. My mom would also buy original art in galleries when we’d go to the Jersey shore.

I remember the romance of finding a set of hard pastels in a wooden box in my Gmas attic.

When did you recognize a special talent or interest in art? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember a specific setting?

I remember it as a moment in the 4th grade. I had always liked to draw, but Laney Crawford in 4th grade was really good and could draw anything and she showed me how to “draw what you see.” It was like a Zen moment of realization. Suddenly, I realized I could draw anything. I’ve always loved art; the smell, the look, being alone, the doing of it.

What did your parents say when you told them you were going to be an artist? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember the specific setting?

My parents wanted me to be an architect because that was the practical thing. They appreciated my talent, but didn’t think I could make a living at it. Then, in my last year of high school, my lifelong friend, Emmy, said “of course you’re going to major in art.” And, that was that. They got used to the idea.

Who or what were your early creative inspirations?

Laney Crawford in 4th grade. My friend and co-worker, Ann, in Boulder, CO when I was a young sign painter. She started actually selling silk screen art. I thought, if she can do it, I can do it so I did.

Artistically, Thomas McKnight who was a silk screener. I saw his stuff in NYC gallery and loved it. He painted interiors looking out into the moon and night sky. They were happy and bright. Also, Thomas Hart Benton of the 1930s. He painted rolling landscapes and motion.

Which artists are you following currently?

Nobody, really. Maybe modern artists. Contemporary paintings. I am inspired by the new look of contemporary, modern art.

What, besides the obvious, do you like about selling your art?

I love talking to people about my art. I like hearing what people see in my work. It’s interesting what it brings out in people.

What do you think is the role of art in a society?

Art has the capability to make people happy. It brings out good feelings. It brings out deep feelings in people. It has the ability to revives them and add passion to their lives.

What is the funkiest job you’ve taken to support your art?

I am lucky enough to have always made my living as an artist.

Anything particularly interesting or striking about your story that you’d like to share?

My current work celebrates my life and my life as a traveler. The maps, the nostalgia they hold for the days of map travel, bring depth and a shared appreciation of how the world is changing. Maps evoke both adventure and safety because they indicate you are on an unknown road and actually tell you where to go.

I honor and appreciate map makers and the beauty they put to their task.

3-3001-300

Artisans Festival 2014 – Meet the Maker, David Wong

2-300Meet photographer David Wong.  Wong began showing his work only eight short years ago after a prior lifetime career in film production. He was inspired by his teacher, Ted Orland, one of Ansel Adams assistants, who felt he had a unique eye for light, subject and composition. In his work, Wong looks for a unique sense of art and story as created by the subject, light, composition, movement, and other “of the moment” factors. Wong’s soft spoken manner is evident in his photos, each of which offers a calm, peaceful reflection of nature’s beauty.

Wong is one of over 35 artists showing at the annual Artisans Festival, Friday & Saturday, November 28 & 29 at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Tickets $3, $5 Weekend Pass, Children 15 and under free.  Daily hours are 10am-5pm.

What was the art background of your childhood?

I was a photographer from the age of 15. I did darkroom work and experimented a bit but it wasn’t until later in my life that I “woke-up” to art and photography. I made a switch from engineering and business mentality to an art orientation.

When did you recognize a special talent or interest in art? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember a specific setting?

I had taken a photography class from Ted Orland, who was one of Ansel Adams assistants. I did a photograph of a lighthouse at night for the class and I found out later that he was showing the photograph to his classes. It gave me inspiration and encouragement that maybe I could do this. Shortly after, I entered a number of photographs in a show and was successful in selling many of them. I never looked back.

What did your parents say when you told them you were going to be an artist? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember the specific setting?

My parents were gone by the time I became an artist.

Who or what were your early creative inspirations?

Edward Hopper, Edward Weston, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Ansel Adams, Georgia O’Keeffe, Claude Monet, Vincent Van Gogh

Which artists are you following currently?

Charles Cramer, Annie Leibovitz, Art Wolfe

What, besides the obvious, do you like about selling your art?

I enjoy relating my love of art to the people who enjoy my vision. I very much like teaching photography and getting others to excel in their development of photography and the arts.

What do you think is the role of art in a society?

Art brings great enjoyment and appreciation to life. It expands ways of thinking and creativity in how we tackle our individual lives. I believe that people who learn to appreciate art in their lives tend to be less self-focused.

What have been the biggest sacrifices you’ve made for your art?

I don’t feel that I’ve had to make big sacrifices for my art, in fact, it’s quite the opposite. I have gained much by being an artist.

What is the funkiest job you’ve taken to support your art?

I pretty much enjoy all my work.

Anything particularly interesting or striking about your story that you’d like to share?

I didn’t come to art until I was almost 60. I think self-doubt and thinking that you can’t do art is too big an obstacle for many. I never thought I had an artistic bone in my body. I used to hate going to museums and galleries! Now, I am biggest student. Never too late to learn.

1-3003-300

Artisans Festival 2014 – Meet the Maker, LeeAnn Brook

PaintingSundownMeet LeeAnn Brook a Nevada City, California-based artist whose works explore landscape through color and movement. Using an expressive layering of colors, textures, and awareness of light, Brook’s paintings are inspired by environments of water, grasslands, gardens and forests that surround us.

Brook is one of over 35 artists showing at the annual Artisans Festival, Friday & Saturday, November 28 & 29 at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Tickets $3, $5 Weekend Pass, Children 15 and under free.  Daily hours are 10am-5pm.

Filled with intensity of color, light and unique textures, Brook’s large format contemporary landscape paintings are built with layers of color and patterns that reflect the layers of nature. Depth is created with the use of subtle patterns and textures that are then integrated into the painting as a whole, where the technique becomes secondary only to the full effect of a vibrant landscape, encouraging us to notice what is beneath the surface of what we see every day.

What was the art background of your childhood?

My dad was an artist, but he died when I was six. My mom was not artistic so she put art mentors in my life, starting with a neighbor boy who taught me about classic art and artists.

When did you recognize a special talent or interest in art? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember a specific setting?

In kindergarten I knew I would be an artist. Literally, it was the very first time the teacher said “tomorrow we’ll be working with paint.” I brought my brush, my smock, and cousin’s majorette baton to paint. I loved that thing and when I painted it the other kids kept coming around saying it was good and asking if I was going to be an artist someday. I said, “yes” and that day encouragement set the course of my life.

What did your parents say when you told them you were going to be an artist? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember the specific setting?

My mom knew I loved art and continued to support my talent. She also made sure I developed my secretarial skills. I suppose she thought art would be my hobby.

Then, when I was a senior in high school, I took a graphic arts class and loved it. My family wasn’t able to pay for me to go to college, but my teachers and guidance counselor encouraged me to apply to a graphic arts school. The day I told my mom, she said something like, “Oh no, honey, you need to be a secretary.” And, then I went to graphic design school.

Who or what were your early creative inspirations?

I’ve had a lot of mentors who helped me recognize my inspirations.

There was an older kid in my neighborhood who was very artistic. My mom got him to come and teach me to paint. I lived in a very rural area where there wasn’t much exposure to art. He gave me the classics.

Then a neighbor moved in who also recognized my talent and mentored me.  I attended a great high school that had an incredible art program.  And, then, at 18, met a man who was an abstract painter and he introduced me to the art scene; and the ins and outs of being an artist like museums, supplies, other artists.

What, besides the obvious, do you like about selling your art?

I love talking about art. The first time I did open studios, finally after 40 years, I was able to overcome my shyness and just couldn’t shut up. I feel that’s what doing art shows is about; the conversation between artist and collector is one about what turns you on. I thrive on the direct interaction and connection.

What do you think is the role of art in a society?

My role as an artist is to do art that gives enjoyment to someone else. My art is made to bring beauty to a patron’s home. I get to share and pass on beauty. Art brings beauty and appreciation.

What have been the biggest sacrifices you’ve made for your art?

I don’t feel I have sacrificed. My life has been nothing but full and rich. Being an artist has brought so much to me. I am humbled by the life I get to live.

What is the funkiest job you’ve taken to support your art?

Luckily, every job I’ve worked in has been related to being an artist and a businessperson. The funkiness is just that it’s my business and I do everything from toilets to windows.

Anything particularly interesting or striking about your story that you’d like to share?

Most of my career has been as a graphic designer. I started painting again about 12 years ago and now I have 2 studios.

I just published a book that will be out by the time of Artisans. It is about my work and how in art one medium affects another. It’ll make a great gift item.

1-300 3-300

ARTISANS FESTIVAL 2014 – MEET THE MAKER, BRIGITTE MAYER

1-300Meet Davis, CA based artist Brigitte Mayer.  Mayer’s work, whether printing, painting, sculpture, carving, or furniture and lamps – is steeped in the German forms and fairytales of her childhood. The spare tidiness and love of line are the influence of her cabinetmaker father. Finding art in found objects, such as beautifully transformed cocoa pods of hundreds of formica samples, creates the unusual diversity.

Mayer is one of over 35 artists showing at the annual Artisans Festival, Friday & Saturday, November 28 & 29 at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Tickets $3, $5 Weekend Pass, Children 15 and under free.  Daily hours are 10am-5pm.

What was the art background of your childhood?

My dad was a master craftsman and cabinet builder straight from Germany. I thought it was boring and would never have thought building things out of wood would be my ultimate passion in those days.

When did you recognize a special talent or interest in art? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember a specific setting?

Others in my family had talent, but I never saw it in myself. I was a mom. When my kids got more independent I needed something to do so I started working with a friend who worked with wood. To my surprise, I realized it was fun, interesting, and I was good at it. Then, it turned out people liked it, wanted to buy my art and the whole business started snowballing.

These days, I’m a tool junkie. I love the challenge of finding the right tool for the job and learning to use it with expertise. It’s like a puzzle and I love puzzles.

What did your parents say when you told them you were going to be an artist? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember the specific setting?

My parents were already gone by the time I started creating things. I took them around to some local shops and they liked my work. and she just kept giving them her works and they kept selling. Decided she wanted a studio and refurbished the garage as a workspace. It was fun, people liked her stuff, and they were inspired by her creations which keeps fueling her craft.

Who or what were your early creative inspirations?

Definitely I was inspired by my dad. He could make anything. I also had a creative aunt who I was named after. She was an abstract painter, ceramicist, and overall fine artist whereas my dad’s works were functional. I guess I’m a bit of both.

Which artists are you following currently?

I mostly see something and the materials catch my eye, not really people or artists. I am always looking for interesting ways to use materials and tools.

What, besides the obvious, do you like about selling your art?

I feel validated. When someone actually pays their good hard earned money for what I create, I feel successful.

What do you think is the role of art in a society?

Art makes us feel alive and separates us from being just pure animals. The ability to appreciate creating makes life bearable and interesting. Creativity has the power to evoke excitement regardless of how the circumstances of the day are going.

What have been the biggest sacrifices you’ve made for your art?

Well, my kids say “It’s all you do!” Maybe, the ability to be nurturing, helpful, and available to the kids on some level.

What is the funkiest job you’ve taken to support your art?

Doing art and making money at it feels like the funkiest job I’ve ever done.

Anything particularly interesting or striking about your story that you’d like to share?

I have a hard time letting go of my art because I love each piece so much.

3-300OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

2014 Artisans Festival Gallery

Start your holiday season with a visit to the 2014 Artisans Festival – Friday and Saturday, November 28 & 29 at the historic Miners Foundry Cultural Center.  This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Hours 10am-5pm.  Tickets $3/per day, $5/Weekend Pass, Children under 15 free.  Below is a gallery of this year’s more than thirty participating artisans.

Karen West, Jewelry

Karen West, Jewelry

Erin Kinsley

Erin Kinsley, Plant Paintings

Cindy Ayala

Cindy Ayala, Clothing

Brigitte Mayer

Brigitte Mayer, Found Object, Screen and Wood Block

Martha Jones, Reuse Ceramics

Martha Jones Reuse Artist

Don Augstein

Don Augstein, Wood

Eileen Blodgett

Eileen Blodgett, Acrylic, Print, Water Color

Elany Prusa, Hand Painted Functional tiles

George Anderson

George Anderson, Jewelry

Jack West

Jack West, Wood

Jerianne VanDijk

Jerianne VanDijk, Water Color

Jude Bischoff

Jude Bischoff, Oil Paintings

Kathryn Wronski

Kathryn Wronski, Oil Paintings

Kelly Bechtold

Girl on a Motorcycle, Leather

 

Krista Tranquillo

Krista Tranquilla, Jewelry

Linda Curtis

Linda Curtis, Water Color

Liz Collins

Liz Collins, Mixed Media

Lynn Wood

Lynn Wood, Ceramics

Martin Haechler

Martin Haechler, Martin Arkenstone

Maura Blackburn

Maura Blackburn, Ceramics

Omonivie Okhade

Omonivie Okhade, Jewelry

Paul Steege

Paul Steege, Ceramics

Phyllis Williams

Phyllis Williams, Glass

Richard Davis

Richard Davis, Leather

Seth Simpson

Seth Simpson, Ceramics

Shawn Ray Harris

Shawn Ray Harris, Photography

David Wong

David Wong, Nature and Landscape Art

Susan Porter

Susan Porter, Painting, Drawing, Digital

LeeAnn Brook

LeeAnn Brook, Acrylic, Mixed Media

Donald Dalke

Donald Dalke, Wood

Kathryn Finn

Kathryn Finn, Jewelry

Karen West

 

Myah Sarles, Mixed Media

 

 

2014 Artisans Festival ~ November 28 & 29, 2014

NCAF_2014_11x17-2Start your holiday season with a visit to the 2014 ARTISANS FESTIVAL – FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 28 & 29 at the historic Miners Foundry Cultural Center.  This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Tickets $3, $5 Weekend Pass, Children 15 and under free.  Daily hours are 10am-5pm.

PHOTO GALLERY OF 2014 ARTISANS

“It is a new year for the Artisans Festival and it’s going to be a fun, exciting time,” explains the show’s producer Laura Gerhart.

Local musicians scheduled to perform include Lisa Stine on harp, Heather MacAdam on guitar with Phyllis Grant on flute; and Lorraine Gervais accompanied by Jacob Aginsky doing 20s and 30s Jazz tunes at the Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.

“Our vision for the Artisans Cafe is that it will be an artistic ephemeral space that will exist only for the duration of the event.   It will be an interactive mirage,” says artist, designer and teacher Faye Schoolcraft.  “Inside the installation, there will be tables for dining, live acoustic music, artwork, a bar, and areas for people to participate by adding their own creative expression.”  Schoolcraft is the magic behind the festival’s Acoustic Café and Wine Bar set, as well as an installation artist showing her frisky fiber figurine sculptures.  Schoolcraft who currently resides in Nevada City and teaches at Sierra College has exhibited nationally including New York City, Los Angeles, and at Burning Man in the Black Rock Desert, NV.

hey-man

Tahiti Pehrson

The Festival artists have been juried by a distinguished group of local artisans who looked for the highest quality of wares and craftsmanship.   Gerhart and this year’s jury members have selected several new artisans to participate in the show.  In fact, nearly half of the artists are new to the festival this year with a third of them coming from out of the area.

Some of the new artists include:

Tahiti Pehrson, is based in Nevada County with long ties to the Bay Area.  Pehrson has been working in paper for nearly fifteen years.  Recent works explores the fragility and interconnectedness expressed by physical structures. Large scale installations of geometrical hand cut paper are layered into three-dimensional structures.  His work has shown internationally including London, Cape Town, and San Francisco.

David Wong 1

David Wong

David Wong, the only nature photographer in the show, began showing his work only 8 short years ago after a prior lifetime career in film production.  He was inspired by his teacher, Ted Orland, one of Ansel Adams’ assistants, who felt he had a unique eye for light, subject and composition.  David’s soft spoken manner is evident in his photos, each of which offers a calm, peaceful reflection of nature’s beauty.

Kelly Bechtold, owner of Girl on a Motorcycle luxe leather accessories out of Berkeley, CA, founded her company in 2007 and has been busy designing and selling to a loyal and growing audience ever since.  Her bags and accessories are timelessly designed, made by hand and built to endure.  No machines, no factories-just Kelly, a workbench, some hand tools and a good record playing on the turntable.  Her materials are sourced of the finest produces American deer, buffalo and cattle hides and feature high quality fixtures and adornments.

Myah Sarles, BFA, a traveler, snowboarder and fine artist joins the festival from Marin County where she creates highly textured, energetic, adventurous, colorful, joyous, imaginative and intuitive works of 2D art.  Fortunate to have traveled the globe extensively, Myah draws inspiration from the textures, patterns and colors naturally present on Earth and uses this to fuel the fire for her art.

Jude Bischoff

Jude Bischoff

Returning artists include Liz Collins, LeeAnn Brook, Jude Bischoff, Kathryn Wronski, Karen and Jack West, Sweetland Pottery, Eileen Blodgett, Ride ’em George,Don Augstein, Lynn Wood, Richard Davis, Martha Jones, Elany Prusa, Kathryn Finn, Seth Simpson, Phyllis Williams and Donald Dalke.

“I have always seen the Artisans Festival as a local fall gem of an event.   It’s a great time to hang out with friends or bring visiting family,” says Gerhart.  “Plus, with its small town appeal and classy setting, it is the perfect addition or antidote, depending on your point of view, to ‘Black Friday’.”

Artisans Festival is an annual fundraiser for the Foundry, one of Nevada County’s most beautiful historic landmarks. Artisans Festival is the kickoff of to the holiday season for the Foundry with its beautiful halls decorated with twinkling lights, festive garland and wreaths.

 

Call to Artists ~ Artisans Festival

Artisans Call to ArtistsEvent Dates:  November 28 & 29, 2014, 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Application Deadline:  June 20, 2014
Accept / Non Accept letters will be sent no later than July 15, 2014
Booth fee due upon acceptance and no later than August 31, 2014

Read more

Artisans Festival ~ Call to Artists

Vendor Application

Event Dates:  November 28 & 29, 2014, 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Application Deadline:  June 20, 2014
Accept / Non Accept letters will be sent no later than July 15, 2014
Booth fee due upon acceptance and no later than August 31, 2014

About Us

Nevada City Winter 2Nevada City is among the most interesting of the California Gold Rush towns, attracting visitors from far and wide, especially during the holiday season.  Nevada County, of which Nevada City is the county seat, boasts a population of almost 100,00 people and is well known in Northern California as a destination for art, music, and various cultural events.  The entire downtown district is a national historic landmark where guests enjoy quality restaurants, comfortable lodgings and a variety of fine shops, boutiques, galleries, and museums, all flavored with old-fashioned Nevada City hospitality.

Visit the Nevada City Chamber of Commerce to see for yourself.

Akim Aginksy

Akim Aginksy

Miners Foundry Cultural Center is a lively downtown community hub serving Nevada County as a site for concerts, conferences, weddings, festivals, and many other public and private events.  The Foundry is a non-profit trust, Artisans Festival is one of its biggest fundraisers of the year.

The Artisans Festival is celebrating its 40th Anniversary, and is known as a local gem providing the community with a post-Thanksgiving event to enjoy with their family and friends, and giving artists a place to market their work to holiday motivated buyers.

Vendor Features

Features of this show include an historic, intimate holiday atmosphere, electricity to each booth, live background entertainment, cafe style food and drink, art installations, and complementary performance artisans, and optional central MasterCard/Visa service.  This is a small but select show with about 30 artists.  The artist’s presence is required both days, no reps!

Eligibility

Artisans Call to ArtistsEligible media includes:  painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, wood, fiber, stone, clay, metals, leather, etc.  Not eligible:  foot items, t-shirts, “country” crafts, taped music, imported goods, embellished purchased clothing, buy-and-sell, items made from kits or commercial molds.  Reproductions are allowed but must be labeled as such in your display.

We do not accept any forms of commercially produced or manufactured goods.

This is a juried show for all applicants.  Jurying is all-at-once.  Jury consists of working artists who are not participating in the event.

Jewelers, please note:  We receive more applications in jewelry than any other category, by far.  We jury for variety as well as quality:  accepted jewelers represent about 20% of the festival’s participants.

Submission Requirements

Submit 3 photos of your work and 1 photo of your display space.  Photos must be in jpg or tif format and a minimum of 300 dpi at 6″.  Please, no images with watermarks or time/date stamps.

Display Requirements

Booth sizes are 8W x 9D feet or 11W x 6D.  The number of 11×6 spaces is limited to 8.  This year’s show has the ability to include a handful of artists with smaller than 8×9 booths.  Indicate your choice on the application.  You will be informed before the show which size you will be given.  All efforts will be made to accommodate artist choice.

A professional looking display is required.  Displays should be tidy, level, and attractive to the eye.

Booth Fee

$300.00 due upon acceptance.  We do not offer double booths.

Refund Policy

No refunds will be issued.

Questions

Please email Laura Gerhart, Event Producer with your questions, artisansfestival@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

Artisans Festival – Meet the Maker, Elany Prusa

jiri_and_elany_pics_for_website_008Meet artist Elany Prusa of Pacific Blue Tile.  Elany is one of over 35 artists showing at the 39th annual Artisans Festival, Thanksgiving Weekend at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition features Northern California’s finest artisans showing original, hand-crafted art.  Meet the artisans and makers.  Expect to find the extraordinary at this show.  November 29 – December 1, 10am-5pm, $3 daily admission, $5 weekend pass.

I am the artist for our family’s small hand painted tile business for 30 years.  I start out making a pencil line drawing of my design which we then make into a silkscreen. My husband then screens a mixture of wax resist and black colorant (manganese) through the silkscreen lines onto a plain ceramic 6”x6” tile.  This is done manually one tile at a time.  When dry I am able to paint & color scheme the tile and fire it to see how it comes out.  Sometimes this involves 10 or more “test” firings therefore 10 more days as it takes a kiln one day to fire and cool off again.  After that we use my chosen color scheme and paint each tile individually one tile at a time using ceramic glazes.  We then fire in our kiln to 1800o and the tiles turn into a beautiful, shiny and durable work of art or for use as a hot plate.

My husband also hand makes misshapen ceramic plates as background canvases for me to do one-of-a-kind original ceramic paintings onto.  We also do large 15/20 tile mural scenes which utilize the same techniques.  I have made all of my tile designs into individual magnets as well – trying to tap into the less expensive gift market. (photos in catalog)  I also started a new line of Dog Design tiles which have become quite popular and I now have 36 different breeds and counting.

prusa_1aprusa_1b

Artisans Festival – Meet the Maker, Paul Steege

Meet ceramics artist Paul Steege of Sweetland Pottery.  You might have seen his beautiful pottery on the cover of the Union’s Prospector this week.  Paul and his wife Tina are one of over 35 artists showing at the 39th annual Artisans Festival, Thanksgiving Weekend at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition features Northern California’s finest artisans showing original, hand-crafted art.  Meet the artisans and makers.  Expect to find the extraordinary at this show.  November 29 – December 1, 10am-5pm, $3 daily admission, $5 weekend pass.

I have always found joy in working with my hands, whether the material is wood, fiber, metal, or clay. It was not until I was in college in the 80s that I learned how to throw pots, whiling away many hours in the University of Vermont Pottery Co-op. In 1993, after having moved to the Sierra foothills, I resumed the study of clay with Francesca Roveda, who not only helped me develop my skills, but also introduced me to the possibilities of making a living as a studio artist.

In 1995 my wife, Tina, and I started Sweetland Pottery, making pots in a little studio adjoining our home and taking them around to craft shows on the weekends. I did all of the wet clay work, while Tina glazed and fired the ware in electric kilns. In about 2001, after moving to a new location, a new gas kiln was built. At this time I took over all of the studio work, though Tina continues to support me, handling administrative tasks, bookkeeping, traveling to shows with me, and sometimes assisting in kiln loading.

My current line of high-fired functional porcelain ware includes cups, bowls, teapots, soup tureens, storage jars, and various table items. I also make complete dish sets to order. Most pieces are made on the potters’ wheel with subsequent alteration techniques, and some pieces are constructed from clay slabs. The ware is fired to cone 10 (about 2300 degrees F) in a gas kiln. My glaze palette includes traditional Asian-style glazes, such as a smoky gold shino, a fluid wood-ash glaze, and a rich dark temmoku. Many of my pieces are distinguished by handles I make from manzanita twigs I gather on my land in the Sierra foothills. This softer wood element compliments the hardness of the ceramic forms. I work to find a balance between precision and happenstance. I am also trying for a fluidity of line and surface that porcelain lends itself so well to.

Although my work reflects forms and textures in nature as well as qualities I have seen and admired in the creations of people, I believe that my pots possess a style that is an expression of who I am and what is important to me. Values I strive for include simplicity, integrity, and beauty. It is my hope that these values are imparted to those using this pottery.

4teapotbarium_blue1_compost_jarturq_rust

3_facetted_tumblersturquoise_and_rust2_manz_bowlbl_ash_rust

 

Artisans Festival – Meet the Maker, Cindy Hintz

cindy

Meet fiber artist Cindy Hintz of Pine Street Porch.  You might have seen her beautiful art on the cover of the Union’s Prospector this week.  She is one of over 35 artists showing at the 39th annual Artisans Festival, Thanksgiving Weekend at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition features Northern California’s finest artisans showing original, hand-crafted art.  Meet the artisans and makers.  Expect to find the extraordinary at this show.  November 29 – December 1, 10am-5pm, $3 daily admission, $5 weekend pass.

Cindy was born and raised in California. Her education is in Interior Design. Cindy worked as a custom sewing fabricator for an upscale boutique as she completed her education. Upon graduation, Cindy began her career as a design coordinator, moving into a full- fledged project manager for over 15 years. She worked overseas in Singapore as the project manager, leading the design effort for a 220,000 sq. ft. headquarters building for a Silicon Valley Company. It was during this stay overseas that Cindy traveled widely and she developed a love for Asian art and fabrics, so evident in many of her fiber art themes. In 2009 Cindy left the corporate world, and opened her business “Pine Street Porch”. She found her passion lies in creating fiber art in the form of exquisite tapestry wall hanging originals. Her studio is in Nevada City, CA.

Cindy, opened Pine Street Porch in 2009. Her art creations take the form of original wall tapestries comprised of both commercial and rare vintage fabric finds. Cindy’s concept will come as a simple thought, often inspired by her exquisite garden and nature scenery in her home town of Nevada City.

As a detailed concept builds over time, Cindy mocks up a full scale sketch, and then begins the elaborate process of layering fabric after fabric embellished with hand or machine appliqué, quilting, embroidery and beading.

joywinds_of_chage_webmatts_catchweb