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Artisans Festival 2014 – Meet the Maker, Shawn Ray Harris

2-300Meet San Francisco based photographer Shawn Ray Harris.  Harris’ development as an artist has been of two paths: the first path, exploring the medium itself by making three-dimensional photography while working in manufacturing; and, the second path, using photography traditionally, exploring his personal interests, often with a sense of humor. He recalls an art teacher saying, “Have a job and make art on the side. Eventually, depending on your commitment, one will win out and you will find yourself doing what you were meant to do.” This holds true. Six years ago, Harris began making art full time. His art also had two separate paths that became one: he focuses on making work that is deeply personal and that also pushes the boundaries of photography.

Harris thinks of the camera/photography as a tool, as an in-depth sketch book that captures ideas. He uses a camera, sometimes in a traditional sense, most of the time in tandem with a computer and editing software. Cameras, film, software and technologies will change. He enjoys working through how to best use available tools to capture, record, and translate his imagination. That’s what’s important to him. “Along the way, if I enable myself and a few others to laugh…then I feel I am doing what I was meant to do,”

Harris is one of over 35 artists showing at the annual Artisans Festival, Friday & Saturday, November 28 & 29 at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Tickets $3, $5 Weekend Pass, Children 15 and under free.  Daily hours are 10am-5pm.

What was the art background of your childhood?

My dad did landscape oil painting on the side, but put it away early on. My mom always doing crafts for sale. Their interests gave me the ability to do my own thing because there were always supplies to tinker with. They definitely put value put on creating things.

When did you recognize a special talent or interest in art? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember a specific setting?

My interest and talent were always there as long as I remember. I wasn’t interested in other subjects like math. Art always held my interest. It gave me direction. My teachers in mid school and high school saw my talent and interest. They were good at inspiring me to keep doing art as a valuable and pursuable field.

What did your parents say when you told them you were going to be an artist? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember the specific setting?

I wasn’t a moment. I went to art school because it became the obvious choice. My parents always supported doing that which you love to do. They, probably like other parents, were a bit concerned about me making a living at it, but realized it’s important to do what you love in life.

Who or what were your early creative inspirations?

I saw other students at school who were really good and that was motivating. I wanted that, too. I specifically remember noticing good imagery, Annie Leibowitz especially. She blew my mind with her intelligence, creativity and playfulness. Jerry Ueslmann, who was a traditional dark room photographer. He did some super surreal work and I was amazed he could do that with photography.

Which artists are you following currently?

No one especially. Just my muse. Street artists if anything catches my interest. I have a total respect for spray can art. I am inspired by their ability, the design, the place, the temporary nature with danger in the background. The way they do it makes art available to everyone, not just art people. They put it right in our backyard.

What, besides the obvious, do you like about selling your art?

I like the gauge on how it’s being received. The instant feedback. Being acceptable and being affirmed encourages me to move in further and keep going. The fact that I can make art that is interesting to me and can be sold is pretty fantastic.

What do you think is the role of art in a society?

I hope the role of the artist is to point out and/or comment on society at large. I think I’m still working on my art as a comment on something larger than dressing up in masks and taking pictures of myself. Art is so much more enjoyable, approachable, deeper, broader and bigger than just something for sale.

What have been the biggest sacrifices you’ve made for your art?

I’d say sometimes I am too focused and keep on track at the expense of people around him.

What is the funkiest job you’ve taken to support your art?

One eclectic urban patron of mine had me gold leaf a gorilla skeleton. That was weird. I Pop Arted it.

Anything particularly interesting or striking about your story that you’d like to share?

I am also an oil painter and mixed media artist. I see myself as just an average Joe plugging away.1-3004-300

Artisans Festival 2014 – Meet the Maker, Kelly Bechtold

3-350Meet Kelly Bechtold owner and designer of Girl on a Motorcycle.  The lovechild of glamour and grit, Girl on a Motorcycle is a California conceived, Colorado born luxe leather accessories label. Founded in 2007 by Bechtold, the brand has become known for unique handmade “must have” allure. The inspired design & painstaking construction of pieces utilizes the highest quality leather hides, and distinctive riveted hardware. Girl on a Motorcycle style is a blend of 1960’s innocence and 1970’s Rock n’ Roll decadence. Incorporating timeless style with strength and durability, this line has a lasting quality almost unrecognizable in today’s disposable culture.  Bechtold believes in things that last. My bags and accessories are timelessly designed, made by hand and build to endure. No machines, no factories-just Bechtold, a workbench, some hand tools and a good record playing on the turntable. Her materials are sourced of the finest produces American deer, buffalo and cattle hides and feature high quality fixtures and adornments.

Bechtold is one of over 35 artists showing at the annual Artisans Festival, Friday & Saturday, November 28 & 29 at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Tickets $3, $5 Weekend Pass, Children 15 and under free.  Daily hours are 10am-5pm.

What was the art background of your childhood?

I was raised off the grid in a Colorado mountain canyon by a hippie mom who encouraged me to see the design in everything. She valued taking time for dreaming and hearing the call of my creative soul. She left me with an appreciation of nature’s design and repetitive patterns.

When did you recognize a special talent or interest in art? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember a specific setting?

In my early 20s I worked in a vintage clothing store and was obsessed with making our displays beautiful. After that, I worked as a wardrobe stylist and found I had a knack for set design. I am obsessed with the special arrangement of beauty.

I was surrounded by people who were “fine artists” and didn’t see myself in their league so I kept it quiet. Also, I just never found the fashion industry inspiring or interesting. It had too many rules.

Then, 7 years ago I started making leather bags and found a love for taking a big hide and having the muse bring out the beauty in it. I was only mediocre at first, but persevered until one day I made something “cool!” I felt connected to the divine inspiration and started creating a collection. My family and friends liked them and gave me a lot of encouragement. Now, I consider myself a designer and I love my bags. Each has a personality and is looking for just the right owner.

What did your parents say when you told them you were going to be an artist? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember the specific setting?

My mom always kind of knew I was going to do something artistic and so she wasn’t surprised. She raised me to be independent and a little bit different. Now, she is over the moon proud and couldn’t be happier that my work arises in me from a deep place and is nature based.

Who or what were your early creative inspirations?

My supportive family and teachers I’ve had along the way. And, NATURE absolutely.

Which artists are you following currently?

My musician friends bring life and joy. Rhiannon the bead maker. Her design and color choices bring out the goddess in women who wear her jewelry.

I share fascination with woodworkers who see form in raw materials.

Louise Nedelson. Georgia O’Keefe. Rustic artisans. Those who see what can come from the inside and shine through from its life force. Paco Rabin. “I traded my needle and thread for pliers and a blow torch.”

What, besides the obvious, do you like about selling your art?

I like that I’ve gone from making purses to really creating art forms. I like the direct human interaction and the joy that I see when someone gets something fine for themselves. I like making bags that are “different, unique and get better with time” just like women. I like that my artform gives comfort and beauty that can leave the house with you.

What do you think is the role of art in a society?

To inspire the dreamer in each person and show that there are languages each of us speak and all of them matter. Art allows us to hear the voice of love and that the universe give to us all. Artisans put that love into form and give it away to everyone. Art connects us to other dimensions of the human experience.

What have been the biggest sacrifices you’ve made for your art?

Stability and peace of mind about the future. Being willing to live the roller coaster of success. Wear and tear on my body.

Anything particularly interesting or striking about your story that you’d like to share?

I am self-taught. Everything that comes out of me comes from somewhere unique to me. I’ve never taken classes; no one has taken time to teach me. My art comes out of my experiences and my inner vision.

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Artisans Festival 2014 – Meet the Maker, David Wong

2-300Meet photographer David Wong.  Wong began showing his work only eight short years ago after a prior lifetime career in film production. He was inspired by his teacher, Ted Orland, one of Ansel Adams assistants, who felt he had a unique eye for light, subject and composition. In his work, Wong looks for a unique sense of art and story as created by the subject, light, composition, movement, and other “of the moment” factors. Wong’s soft spoken manner is evident in his photos, each of which offers a calm, peaceful reflection of nature’s beauty.

Wong is one of over 35 artists showing at the annual Artisans Festival, Friday & Saturday, November 28 & 29 at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Tickets $3, $5 Weekend Pass, Children 15 and under free.  Daily hours are 10am-5pm.

What was the art background of your childhood?

I was a photographer from the age of 15. I did darkroom work and experimented a bit but it wasn’t until later in my life that I “woke-up” to art and photography. I made a switch from engineering and business mentality to an art orientation.

When did you recognize a special talent or interest in art? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember a specific setting?

I had taken a photography class from Ted Orland, who was one of Ansel Adams assistants. I did a photograph of a lighthouse at night for the class and I found out later that he was showing the photograph to his classes. It gave me inspiration and encouragement that maybe I could do this. Shortly after, I entered a number of photographs in a show and was successful in selling many of them. I never looked back.

What did your parents say when you told them you were going to be an artist? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember the specific setting?

My parents were gone by the time I became an artist.

Who or what were your early creative inspirations?

Edward Hopper, Edward Weston, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Ansel Adams, Georgia O’Keeffe, Claude Monet, Vincent Van Gogh

Which artists are you following currently?

Charles Cramer, Annie Leibovitz, Art Wolfe

What, besides the obvious, do you like about selling your art?

I enjoy relating my love of art to the people who enjoy my vision. I very much like teaching photography and getting others to excel in their development of photography and the arts.

What do you think is the role of art in a society?

Art brings great enjoyment and appreciation to life. It expands ways of thinking and creativity in how we tackle our individual lives. I believe that people who learn to appreciate art in their lives tend to be less self-focused.

What have been the biggest sacrifices you’ve made for your art?

I don’t feel that I’ve had to make big sacrifices for my art, in fact, it’s quite the opposite. I have gained much by being an artist.

What is the funkiest job you’ve taken to support your art?

I pretty much enjoy all my work.

Anything particularly interesting or striking about your story that you’d like to share?

I didn’t come to art until I was almost 60. I think self-doubt and thinking that you can’t do art is too big an obstacle for many. I never thought I had an artistic bone in my body. I used to hate going to museums and galleries! Now, I am biggest student. Never too late to learn.

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Artisans Festival 2014 – Meet the Maker, LeeAnn Brook

PaintingSundownMeet LeeAnn Brook a Nevada City, California-based artist whose works explore landscape through color and movement. Using an expressive layering of colors, textures, and awareness of light, Brook’s paintings are inspired by environments of water, grasslands, gardens and forests that surround us.

Brook is one of over 35 artists showing at the annual Artisans Festival, Friday & Saturday, November 28 & 29 at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Tickets $3, $5 Weekend Pass, Children 15 and under free.  Daily hours are 10am-5pm.

Filled with intensity of color, light and unique textures, Brook’s large format contemporary landscape paintings are built with layers of color and patterns that reflect the layers of nature. Depth is created with the use of subtle patterns and textures that are then integrated into the painting as a whole, where the technique becomes secondary only to the full effect of a vibrant landscape, encouraging us to notice what is beneath the surface of what we see every day.

What was the art background of your childhood?

My dad was an artist, but he died when I was six. My mom was not artistic so she put art mentors in my life, starting with a neighbor boy who taught me about classic art and artists.

When did you recognize a special talent or interest in art? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember a specific setting?

In kindergarten I knew I would be an artist. Literally, it was the very first time the teacher said “tomorrow we’ll be working with paint.” I brought my brush, my smock, and cousin’s majorette baton to paint. I loved that thing and when I painted it the other kids kept coming around saying it was good and asking if I was going to be an artist someday. I said, “yes” and that day encouragement set the course of my life.

What did your parents say when you told them you were going to be an artist? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember the specific setting?

My mom knew I loved art and continued to support my talent. She also made sure I developed my secretarial skills. I suppose she thought art would be my hobby.

Then, when I was a senior in high school, I took a graphic arts class and loved it. My family wasn’t able to pay for me to go to college, but my teachers and guidance counselor encouraged me to apply to a graphic arts school. The day I told my mom, she said something like, “Oh no, honey, you need to be a secretary.” And, then I went to graphic design school.

Who or what were your early creative inspirations?

I’ve had a lot of mentors who helped me recognize my inspirations.

There was an older kid in my neighborhood who was very artistic. My mom got him to come and teach me to paint. I lived in a very rural area where there wasn’t much exposure to art. He gave me the classics.

Then a neighbor moved in who also recognized my talent and mentored me.  I attended a great high school that had an incredible art program.  And, then, at 18, met a man who was an abstract painter and he introduced me to the art scene; and the ins and outs of being an artist like museums, supplies, other artists.

What, besides the obvious, do you like about selling your art?

I love talking about art. The first time I did open studios, finally after 40 years, I was able to overcome my shyness and just couldn’t shut up. I feel that’s what doing art shows is about; the conversation between artist and collector is one about what turns you on. I thrive on the direct interaction and connection.

What do you think is the role of art in a society?

My role as an artist is to do art that gives enjoyment to someone else. My art is made to bring beauty to a patron’s home. I get to share and pass on beauty. Art brings beauty and appreciation.

What have been the biggest sacrifices you’ve made for your art?

I don’t feel I have sacrificed. My life has been nothing but full and rich. Being an artist has brought so much to me. I am humbled by the life I get to live.

What is the funkiest job you’ve taken to support your art?

Luckily, every job I’ve worked in has been related to being an artist and a businessperson. The funkiness is just that it’s my business and I do everything from toilets to windows.

Anything particularly interesting or striking about your story that you’d like to share?

Most of my career has been as a graphic designer. I started painting again about 12 years ago and now I have 2 studios.

I just published a book that will be out by the time of Artisans. It is about my work and how in art one medium affects another. It’ll make a great gift item.

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ARTISANS FESTIVAL 2014 – MEET THE MAKER, BRIGITTE MAYER

1-300Meet Davis, CA based artist Brigitte Mayer.  Mayer’s work, whether printing, painting, sculpture, carving, or furniture and lamps – is steeped in the German forms and fairytales of her childhood. The spare tidiness and love of line are the influence of her cabinetmaker father. Finding art in found objects, such as beautifully transformed cocoa pods of hundreds of formica samples, creates the unusual diversity.

Mayer is one of over 35 artists showing at the annual Artisans Festival, Friday & Saturday, November 28 & 29 at the Miners Foundry Cultural Center.   This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Tickets $3, $5 Weekend Pass, Children 15 and under free.  Daily hours are 10am-5pm.

What was the art background of your childhood?

My dad was a master craftsman and cabinet builder straight from Germany. I thought it was boring and would never have thought building things out of wood would be my ultimate passion in those days.

When did you recognize a special talent or interest in art? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember a specific setting?

Others in my family had talent, but I never saw it in myself. I was a mom. When my kids got more independent I needed something to do so I started working with a friend who worked with wood. To my surprise, I realized it was fun, interesting, and I was good at it. Then, it turned out people liked it, wanted to buy my art and the whole business started snowballing.

These days, I’m a tool junkie. I love the challenge of finding the right tool for the job and learning to use it with expertise. It’s like a puzzle and I love puzzles.

What did your parents say when you told them you were going to be an artist? Was it a moment or a process? Can you remember the specific setting?

My parents were already gone by the time I started creating things. I took them around to some local shops and they liked my work. and she just kept giving them her works and they kept selling. Decided she wanted a studio and refurbished the garage as a workspace. It was fun, people liked her stuff, and they were inspired by her creations which keeps fueling her craft.

Who or what were your early creative inspirations?

Definitely I was inspired by my dad. He could make anything. I also had a creative aunt who I was named after. She was an abstract painter, ceramicist, and overall fine artist whereas my dad’s works were functional. I guess I’m a bit of both.

Which artists are you following currently?

I mostly see something and the materials catch my eye, not really people or artists. I am always looking for interesting ways to use materials and tools.

What, besides the obvious, do you like about selling your art?

I feel validated. When someone actually pays their good hard earned money for what I create, I feel successful.

What do you think is the role of art in a society?

Art makes us feel alive and separates us from being just pure animals. The ability to appreciate creating makes life bearable and interesting. Creativity has the power to evoke excitement regardless of how the circumstances of the day are going.

What have been the biggest sacrifices you’ve made for your art?

Well, my kids say “It’s all you do!” Maybe, the ability to be nurturing, helpful, and available to the kids on some level.

What is the funkiest job you’ve taken to support your art?

Doing art and making money at it feels like the funkiest job I’ve ever done.

Anything particularly interesting or striking about your story that you’d like to share?

I have a hard time letting go of my art because I love each piece so much.

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2014 Artisans Festival Gallery

Start your holiday season with a visit to the 2014 Artisans Festival – Friday and Saturday, November 28 & 29 at the historic Miners Foundry Cultural Center.  This holiday tradition is one of the longest running festivals in Nevada County and is known for showcasing the exceptional work of regional artisans.  This year’s festival takes the term “Art Party” to another level with dozens of new artists, installation art displays, performance art, live music, children’s holiday art activities, and a rustic, bohemian Acoustic Café and Wine Bar.  Hours 10am-5pm.  Tickets $3/per day, $5/Weekend Pass, Children under 15 free.  Below is a gallery of this year’s more than thirty participating artisans.

Karen West, Jewelry

Karen West, Jewelry

Erin Kinsley

Erin Kinsley, Plant Paintings

Cindy Ayala

Cindy Ayala, Clothing

Brigitte Mayer

Brigitte Mayer, Found Object, Screen and Wood Block

Martha Jones, Reuse Ceramics

Martha Jones Reuse Artist

Don Augstein

Don Augstein, Wood

Eileen Blodgett

Eileen Blodgett, Acrylic, Print, Water Color

Elany Prusa, Hand Painted Functional tiles

George Anderson

George Anderson, Jewelry

Jack West

Jack West, Wood

Jerianne VanDijk

Jerianne VanDijk, Water Color

Jude Bischoff

Jude Bischoff, Oil Paintings

Kathryn Wronski

Kathryn Wronski, Oil Paintings

Kelly Bechtold

Girl on a Motorcycle, Leather

 

Krista Tranquillo

Krista Tranquilla, Jewelry

Linda Curtis

Linda Curtis, Water Color

Liz Collins

Liz Collins, Mixed Media

Lynn Wood

Lynn Wood, Ceramics

Martin Haechler

Martin Haechler, Martin Arkenstone

Maura Blackburn

Maura Blackburn, Ceramics

Omonivie Okhade

Omonivie Okhade, Jewelry

Paul Steege

Paul Steege, Ceramics

Phyllis Williams

Phyllis Williams, Glass

Richard Davis

Richard Davis, Leather

Seth Simpson

Seth Simpson, Ceramics

Shawn Ray Harris

Shawn Ray Harris, Photography

David Wong

David Wong, Nature and Landscape Art

Susan Porter

Susan Porter, Painting, Drawing, Digital

LeeAnn Brook

LeeAnn Brook, Acrylic, Mixed Media

Donald Dalke

Donald Dalke, Wood

Kathryn Finn

Kathryn Finn, Jewelry

Karen West

 

Myah Sarles, Mixed Media

 

 

Nevada City Winter Craft Fair ~ Sunday, December 14, 2014

Winter Craft Fair Scissors.jpgThe Nevada City Winter Craft Fair returns Sunday, December 14, 2014 to the historic Miners Foundry Cultural Center in downtown Nevada City, CA.

All-ages are welcomed and encouraged. Entrance fee is $3.00, children under 12 are free.

The Fair is open from 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Tickets are available online, by phone, or in person at Briar Patch or the Miners Foundry Box Office.

Tickets

 

 

WinterCraftFairThe independent, juried craft fair began in the summer of 2010 by a group of local young crafters, artists and social do-gooders who were inspired by the independent entrepreneurship and creative talents in their community as well as the success of the Renegade Craft Fairs across the US and Europe.

The inaugural event attracted over 800 attendees and showcases the local regions top Etsy vendors, artisans, do-it-yourself crafters, and features their unique, handmade, original and repurposed art, clothing, accessories, jewelry, and housewares. Attendees can also expect to find letterpress, paper and stationary items as well as children’s things, toys (for the young and young at heart), ceramics, bath products, and more

Interested in being a vendor?  Click HERE!

 

 

Photo by Akim Aginksy

Photo by Akim Aginksy


The Mission of the Miners Foundry Cultural Center is to preserve, enhance and utilize the historic Miners Foundry for cultural, educational and social activities.   The Foundry is a non profit organization. 

To support cultural programming and the preservation of the historic Miners Foundry, please become a member or make a donation today.

Nevada City Craft Fair ~ Sunday, June 8, 2014

CraftFair_SierraFAW_adThe Miners Foundry will present the Nevada City Craft Fair on Sunday, June 8, 2014, from 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.  The Fair will feature unique and local handmade artisans and vintage goods.  Food and beverages will be available for purchase.  Admission is $3.00, children under 12 are free.  Tickets are available online, by phone, or in person at the Miners Foundry, in person at Briar Patch Co-Op, and at the door.

Tickets

The independent, juried craft fair showcases Northern California’s top Etsy vendors, artisans, do-it-yourself crafters, and features their unique, handmade, original and repurposed art, clothing, accessories, jewelry, and house wares. Many of these vendors show at the esteemed Renegade Craft Fairs across the country.

Attendees can also expect to find letterpress, paper and stationery items as well as children’s things, toys, ceramics, bath products, and more. Over 60 vendors, reaching as far as Reno, Chico, Sacramento and San Francisco, plus local businesses.

This year’s vendors include Marty May Press & Stitchery, Maldoon Designs of the Heart, The Cosmic Soaper, Rocks, Maps and Crafts, From Nature To Art, TartanHearts Jewelry, Lavendar Sky, Henna Trails, Whims and Wildflowers, Hands Full Designs, Lone Wolf Jewelry, Heather’s Crochet Nook, Black Sheep Design Studio and Marketplace, Why Girl Go Astray, GemMe Design, Carolyne’s Closet, Graphic Anthology, Petercat Jewelry, Hold Your Colour Clothing, Baba Heirlooms, Shop JUST, Louellas Homemade Toffee, Krista Tranquilla Studio, Handmade by Heather and Her Kind, Kiya’s Naturals, Cabrina Channing Silverworks, Poppy Hill Handmade, French Knot Designs, freckle face designs, Old Tree Essentials, SparrowsJewels, Pickle Pottery, Eko Kreations, Fatimas Jeweled Henna, Shorebreak Designs, Terre Busse Studio, Girl on a Bike Designs, Kelly Patton Art, and more.  

Eye of the Avocado will be offering seasonal & local organic savory & sweet options like baker & cakemaker baguette sandwiches, vegetarian grain salads, fun & sweet popsicles & more! Plus delicious coffee from Fable Coffee!

Interested in being a vendor at the next Nevada City Craft Fair?  Email the Producer for more info!  nccraftfair@gmail.com

 

Akim Aginksy

Akim Aginksy

The Mission of the Miners Foundry Cultural Center is to preserve, enhance and utilize the historic Miners Foundry for cultural, educational and social activities.   The Foundry is a non profit organization, pleased to support the Nevada County artisan community.

To support cultural programming and the preservation of the historic Miners Foundry, please become a member or make a donation today.

Miners Foundry

Meet Some of the Nevada City Craft Fair Vendors

This holiday season Shop Local!  The Nevada City Craft Fair returns Sunday, December 16, 2012 to the historic Miners Foundry Cultural Center in downtown Nevada City, CA.  The independent, juried craft fair showcases the local region’s top Etsy vendors, artisans, do-it-yourself crafters, and features their unique, handmade, original and repurposed art, clothing, accessories, jewelry, and housewares.

Attendees can also expect to find letterpress, paper and stationary items as well as children’s things, toys, ceramics, bath products, and more. Over 60 vendors, reaching as far as Reno, Chico, Sacramento and San Francisco. We promise you’ll find something for everyone on your holiday list.

Below, meet some of this year’s vendors and read about their favorite holiday crafts and gift ideas and we’ll see you Sunday, December 16th!

Danielle with Sailors Ravine Studio
Your Craft:  Books Arts, Photography
Favorite holiday art/craft project:  At holiday time any craft that’s not a gift needs to be quick,easy and fun.  Nothing is more simple than making tags and ornaments from last years cards.
Favorite holiday gift to give:  I love giving mandarins from the local farms.  Yummy and good for you!
Favorite holiday gift to receive:  I’m always happy to receive art supplies.
What’s a favorite holiday memory from your childhood:  Making Christmas ornaments one year with my mom.  I was in high school and
they were just inexpensive kits but I’ll never forget that day and now my kids hang those ornaments on our tree.

Briana Reijnen
Your Craft: Letterpress, foil-press, paper goods, pin-back buttons, etc.
Favorite holiday art/craft project: Making gingerbread houses!
Favorite holiday gift to give: Letterpress printed cards and notepads.
Favorite holiday gift to receive: Good company, good food, and good desserts!
What’s a favorite holiday memory from your childhood: Decorating the tree with handmade ornaments, and stringing lights outside. Of course, I can’t leave out listening to the Burl Ives Christmas record over and over!

Miranda Wensel 
Your Craft:  Earrings
Favorite holiday art/craft project: Anything if made with a friend while consuming eggnog and brandy!
Favorite holiday gift to give:  something homemade!  Last year everyone got crocheted coasters.
Favorite holiday gift to receive:  Usually something homemade and edible.
What’s a favorite holiday memory from your childhood:  very carefully, my brother and I would make special sugar cookies for Santa, and ready some carrots for Rudolph.  All that belief in a kind of magic only present in childhood, really made things special around the holidays.

 

Poppy Hill Papers / Gloria Pearson
Your Craft:  Handmade papers including stationary, note and greeting cards, notebooks and other quality  handmade paper goods.
Favorite holiday art/craft project:  I really enjoy making embossed greeting and note cards.  Each card has a unique embossed design, which is fun to choose, but I also do a lot of experimenting with colors and plant textures ending up with a lot of unique cards.  They’re not only a lot of fun to make, but lots of fun to give.
Favorite holiday gift to give:  Cinnamon rolls.  It’s a family tradition.  I grew up having homemade cinnamon rolls for breakfast every Christmas.  When I had a family of my own I made them for our holiday breakfast.  Now I make lots of cinnamon rolls and give them to friends so they can follow my favorite tradition.  I even send one batch of cinnamon rolls to a dear friend in Virginia!
Favorite holiday gift to receive:  Time with my daughters, who are grown and live far away, so we have to make the most of any time we get together.
What’s a favorite holiday memory from your childhood:  It’s not a single memory, more of a family tradition.  As children, we would wake our parents (who I think were probably already awake and just as excited about the morning as we were), and have to wait for my father to get up and shower and shave, and my mom to put the turkey in the oven.  Meanwhile we couldn’t touch any of our gifts except our stockings stuffed with goodies from Santa.  Although we all complained about it every year, I think the excitement and anticipation of the wait made the morning even more fun for all of us.  I continued the tradition with my own kids.

Kiya Rios
Your Craft:  Kiya’s Naturals – Making Up-cycled luxury clothing with cashmere and wool.
Favorite holiday art/craft project:  I look forward to the change in weather to make piles of one of a kind baby-womens clothing and toys. My favorite item to see completed are 4″ baby boots because  you can hold them both in the palm of your hand and marvel.
Favorite holiday gift to give: I love to give something handmade that feels of texture, time, and treasure. If i can’t find that perfect something i settle for chocolate!
Favorite holiday gift to receive: My Stocking filled with tiny packages and chocolate!
What’s a favorite holiday memory from your childhood: The smell of my Grandmothers linens while sleeping over and  the thrill of the day dancing in my head.

Marty May
Your Craft: Screen Printing and Drawing
Favorite holiday art/craft project: I love making the paper dolls holding hands. I usually choose to cut out an animal, though. You know, the one where you fold paper, cut out a character, then unfold it to reveal a string of them holding hands. Great fun!
Favorite holiday gift to give: I usually hand make something. Anything from sculpture, to a simple drawing, to a screen printed item of clothing.
Favorite holiday gift to receive: I like homemade gifts! Anything handmade. Candles are great, sweaters, soaps, preserves, I love them all.

 

Nevada City Winter Craft Fair ~ Sunday, December 16, 2012 ~ 10:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. $3.00

The Miners Foundry’s bi-annual, independent, juried craft fair showcases the local region’s top Etsy vendors, artisans, do-it-yourself crafters, featuring their unique, handmade, original & vintage items.  Interested in becoming a vendor?  Email nccraftfair@gmail.com.

The Winter Craft Fair will be held on Sunday, December 16, 2012, from 10:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.  Admission is $3.00, children are admitted free of charge.

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